Battle Panic 2 Game

Battle Panic 2 Game has not yet been developed, but the speculation about the sequel below is the next best thing,as is playing one of our other games below:

Battle Panic 2 – Thoughts and feelings pertaining to a possible sequel

It’s Fairly Relaxed, Actually

Ninjakiwi have a habit of being responsible for laying down some damned fine flash games on the internet for us all to enjoy. As far as habits go, it most definitely isn’t the worst: this habit has brought us titles like the quirky Bloons Tower Defense 5 and the apocalyptic SAS Zombie Assault TD, and for this we should be eternally thankful for NinjaKiwi having made the world of tower defense a noticeably better place. Our gratitude to NinjaKiwi can only continue to grow, this time from the seedlings of their defensive real-time strategy offering, Battle Panic. A game combining strategic elements of tower defense with real-time battles and a unique mouse-hover control system, Battle Panic isn’t particularly original, but its individual elements combine to form a refreshing take on the real-time strategy style, so is a sequel in the realms of possibility? If it is, then there are a few improvements that could be made to ensure that NinjaKiwi continue their streak of game-development greatness.

Difficulty Issues

The first issue with the original Battle Panic is probably its biggest pitfall, and comes in the form of the game’s difficulty levels. Normal mode serves its purpose as an introductory hand-holding session, and if anything is too easy, allowing you to work your way through the entire game without even breaking a virtual sweat. Hard mode of course ups the stakes a little, but eventually becomes too difficult to bear, that is unless you happen to have the desire to spend some real-life money on extra upgrade stars and resources to help your efforts.

Cranking up the difficulty to such an extent that even hard mode cannot be beaten by those with fairly tight wallets (which, let’s be honest, is 95% of gamers out there) is somewhat of a cheap move by the developers that can turn out to be an expensive burden for the player. It isn’t the difficulty of the game itself that I’m concerned with, but rather the game’s use of it to encourage players to spend money.

Put your Money Away

This brings me onto the issue that is inextricably linked with the difficulty, and this is the underhanded nature of the game’s attempts at getting you to spend your cash. Aside from the tiny ‘buy points’ button tucked into the corner of the upgrades menu, the game gives little indication of the need to spend real money, and instead allows you to find out the hard way after having spent muchos time working through normal mode and reaching a sticking point in Hard Mode. At this point, the only way to become unstuck is to fork out the Benjamins, Elizabeths, or whatever your country’s currency on upgrades in order to stand a chance at progressing further.

Now, I see myself as particularly tight-fisted and averse to spending cash, but even the most open-minded and open-walleted of gamer would be insulted at this game’s method of hand-forcing, not to mention the fact that the game as a whole really isn’t of a great enough stature or quality to warrant spending money on. You can just as easily play games of equal, if not better quality on an entirely transaction-free basis, so NinjaKiwi may need to rethink their financial approach to Battle Panic 2. I would be more inclined to accept an up-front purchase of the game for a small fee than to hand over cash after feeling like I was forced into doing so.

Getting Touchy

Of course, the only way that you can really justify charging a small fee for the game is if it is available on the mobile device market, which brings me to the next possibility: touch-screen gameplay. The unique ‘hover to play’ control system is great for the lazy gamer, and I believe the inverse would also be effective on a handheld device. The game is simply begging to be played on a smartphone with improved HD graphics and a ‘touch-to-play’ mechanic. In the absence of a cursor, your finger would essentially be transformed to God-like status where things only happen if your finger makes them happen. It’s just a thought, the plausibility of which may be clouded by my love for Kingdom Rush, whose iOS incarnation is as perfect as flash-to-phone transitions come.

Magic Moments

While the upgrades in the game are plentiful, and the healing/resurrection properties of your cursor can be classed as supernatural, games of this type are simply crying out for heavy magical involvement, which is something that Battle Panic 2 doesn’t deliver. Battle Panic 2 has the potential to contain all sorts of magical inclusions, and even if we don’t have an actual tower that produces magical troops, there is certainly room for some magical attacks like summoning fire, or an imperio-like charm that makes certain enemies defect to your side. I may be reaching here, but we’re talking about a flash-based fantasy game with orcs in true Lord of the Rings style; do you think Tolkien was reaching?

More Razzle to Go With the Dazzle

It may please you that my thoughts are nearing an end, but before I abscond, I’m sure everyone would agree that even though the graphics are probably above average for a game of this type, there is certainly room for improvement, as well as a need for a better set of music and sound effects, with the soundtrack being rather generic-sounding music often used for epic battles.

 

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